art in july

art in july

There is so much going on in the Second Life art world right now, it’s hard to keep up. Besides the installation The Swamp (image of Bloody Hands – The Church avatar above, free at landing), by Meilo Minotaur and CapCat Ragu, the photograph exhibit Loss, by Senna Coronet, and the permanent Gallery M show The Other, by Mich Michabo, at my own gallery Berg by Nordan Art, there are some excellent art shows all over the grid.

There are two new shows at UTSA ArtSpace, curated by constructivIST Solo and Igor Ballyhoo; a collection of photographs by ◦⊱ Mi ⊰◦ and an installation by Romy Nayar. The new nineteen large mostly color, and a few black and white, photographs on display here by ◦⊱ Mi ⊰◦ are taken at The DNA Tower (Igor Ballyhoo), The Sacrificed Angel (Igor Ballyhoo), The Joy Formidable (Livio Korobase), Penumbra (CapCat Ragu and Meilo Minotaur) and Empty Minds (Romy Nayar). They fit so well in the beautiful gallery build created by Igor. To me, each of ◦⊱ Mi ⊰◦’s images has a dream-like quality, which draws me in and consistently holds my attention. There is a painterly quality to her work, which I think at this point has become a major aspect of her style. Bravo, ◦⊱ Mi ⊰◦, such a strong collection. I never tire of looking at your photographs.

The installation Lamento by Romy Nayar consists of three parts. There is a small build in the gallery itself and two other parts accessible via teleport. Each little build consists of various figures, mostly women I think, that are part of a scene, displaying some form of metaphor. It’s hard to immediately grasp the meaning of these scenes, which all seem quite subjective, all in one way or another perhaps dealing with sadness or grief. To me, Romy’s work is becoming more and more surreal, which I like. There was always something magical about her installations and that has not changed.

There is a new exhibit, Creatures of Light, by Harbor Galaxy, curated by Ux Hax and Romy Nayar, at MetaLES. There are twenty large color images on display by Harbor in the intriguing MetaLES space. The space consists of a floor and walls enveloped in a solid, black velvet-like texture and a ceiling adorned with black and white geometric 3D shapes; dispersed in rows throughout are tall, white street-light-shaped poles. Ux and Romy, the talented curators of this place, continue recognizing that the environment housing the art plays an integral part of the overall display and presentation. Love it. It’s very modern and very much immersive virtual art. It struck me, when first viewing Harbor’s images from a distance, that they remind me of something the abstract expressionist painter Jackson Pollock could have created. Looking closer, however, there is much more to it than that; the subject, lines, light and colors merge invisibly somehow. This is a change for Harbor from her previous style. She notes that [f]or those of you who are familiar with my work through Flickr or shows here inworld…CREATURES OF LIGHT may be something of a departure from my usual style. My objective was to use an avatar devoid of ornamentation and to only utilize poses, light and color to create these pieces and to give myself permission to play and to step outside my comfort zone. So great, Harbor; I am in awe of your utterly new and courageous  approach to virtual images.

There is a new exhibit, Absences, by Melusina Parkin, curated by Dido Haas, at Nitroglobus. Most of us know the images by Melusina from Flickr, where she regularly posts series of five or six photographs that display various themes. Her work is minimalist and I believe barely processed with any kind of photo-tools outside of Second Life. There is something incredibly captivating about viewing her series as each image provides a hint of an idea, but it is really the whole, all images in the series together, that leaves one with a lasting impression. The twelve large color images on display in the Nitroglobus address lack, specifically as it pertains to Second Life. Melusina notes about her exhibit that [a]bsence is a negative concept: it means that something should be there and it doesn’t. So, when we look at an empty place – a room, a seashore, a road or even a chair – we can’t avoid thinking of something or somebody who has been or will be there. That’s even more true when a world, including nature and landscape, is entirely made by humans, like Second Life does…[o]n the other hand, looking at empty spaces is stimulating: when humans aren’t there they can be everything. I love imagining what has happened in a place when people has gone. Or what will happen when it will be populated by people. Spaces and objects shape our behavior: they are the limits or the starts of our actions and of our imagination. This is a wonderful exhibit that should not be missed. Melusina’s photographs fit so beautifully in the Nitroglobus gallery, both compliment each other. Head over and take a look.

Let me end with a few comments about other noteworthy art events. The talented Imani Nayar has a new show, My Furillen, curated by Serene Footman, at Furillen. The exhibit Her and Him, by Hillany Scofield, at dathuil, has been extended over the summer months. There is a new multi-artist show, Beautiful Bizarre, at DaphneArts Gallery. DiXmiX Gallery had an opening of a retrospective group show, Best of 2016-2017, yesterday. There are regular rotating exhibits and weekend-themed events at the gallery Blue Orange, the most recent one, Vintage Circus Freak Show. Last, but not least, the Itakos Gallery has been awarded a LEA grant and the gallery relocated to a new sim, the LEA16 Itakos Project. The opening of the new location will take place tomorrow, Sunday, July 16, at 2PM SLT, make sure not to miss it.

As always when it comes to these monthly art reports, I feel I need to point out that there just is not enough time in the day to cover every exhibit. So there are great Second Life art shows out there that I didn’t cover, my apologies. Let me mention here also that I have rarely experienced as vibrant an art world as we see it right now in our metaverse. More than ever before, we see sim-sized installations and photograph exhibits of incredible quality, all pulled together in collaboration by visionary artists and compassionate curators. We are not getting any kind of monetary reward for doing this, we are all driven simply by the pleasure of creating and sharing art. Bravo, thank you to all and keep it coming!

Photographs by Kate Bergdorf
Exhibit posters by respective galleries and artists

Advertisements

art in may

34527864671_d61c71edeb_o.png

As always when it comes to new art in Second Life, there’s plenty to see. There are at least three photograph exhibits that opened this month. We also have a new installation, Fade Away, by the ever-productive and talented Cica Ghost that opened on May 5. Cica offers a quote by Bob Dylan as a theme: Some people seem to fade away but then when they are truly gone, it’s like they didn’t fade away at all. As so often when it comes to Cica’s work, we are not provided with any kind of extended artist statement from her end. But it doesn’t really matter, of course, as we can certainly derive our own interpretations from what we see. Fade Away comes in various shades of grey. Almost completely black trees, other kinds of dark vegetation, massive grey rock formations, as well as groups of solemn, hooded figures that are dispersed throughout, lending this space a feeling of hopelessness. There are single figures standing around too, some of them appear close to transparent, perhaps hinting at the passing of life. There are clocks dispersed throughout, indicating time, or, a loss or lack of time. Segments of fences are placed throughout, maybe suggesting a division of sorts. As commonly seen in Cica’s work, we also have little scenes scattered throughout, inviting us to take a closer look in order to find meaning. It seems this installation deals with questions about mortality and relationships, the passing of time perhaps, but I am not sure. These are just some feeble attempts from my part to make sense of it. Head over and take a look for yourself at this dark and very beautiful exhibit.

There’s a new exhibit, a Romance in Brooklyn, by Isa Messioptra, at Mirage Gallery, that opened yesterday and will be open for the next month. This is a great little gallery, set on the sim Mirage, owned and curated by Nicasio Ansar. The space itself consist of a maze-like set up of metal structures with divisions, a great back-drop for this playful exhibit by Isa. There are twelve large color images part of this show; with names like let him do the guessing, ….“only one drink though,” share a cab, and ok 3 drinks, each and every one of these photographs is subtly seductive and only leaves the viewer wanting more. Bravo Isa, a cool and sexy exhibit with great energy. A breath of fresh air for sure!

One of my all-time favorite Second Life artists, Sina Souza, has a new exhibit, Mental Levels, at MetaLES, curated by Ux Hax and Romy Nayar. Sina, who started producing art in the virtual world in 2012, also has her own gallery, Mind Factory. The images in the current exhibit at MetaLES are displayed in large black boxes, all positioned on different levels. I counted eleven boxes altogether and each level connects with stairs. The photographs contained in them are bold and strong. To me they feel like they have been painted, but they have not. This artist often addresses in her work societal issues and we see some examples of this here with works like democratic suicide or in the tact of society. A wonderful exhibit Sina, and it is great to see you work in-world again.

Finally, I just had to make a last stop to check out the exhibit by Magic Marker, curated by Sorcha Tyles, at the Artful Expressions Gallery. I believe this is the first exhibit by the talented Miss Marker. This show consists of nine photographs; one in black and white and the rest in color. Magic uses in her photographs vibrant colors, captivating poses and props which she combines to achieve a unique expression that is easily recognizable as hers. Her work is energetic, fun, and full of passion.

Photographs by Kate Bergdorf

two installations

There are two excellent installations to be seen in SL presently; Duality, by Igor Ballyhoo, at Blue Orange, and Empty Minds, by Romy Nayar, on MetaLES. The former just recently opened, the latter has been up for a few weeks already. Let me just comment briefly here on the art venues as well. MetaLES, an old-timer by now in the SL art world, continues to consistently present us with excellent art. Spearheaded by Ux Hax and Romy Nayar, this virtual art space has become a SL classic. I always find myself looking forward what they will show next. Blue Orange, the newish kid on the block, has succeeded to set and maintain high standards for their exhibits as well. I wandered through the gallery today and was impressed by the variety and quality of the art of the current exhibitors Theda Tammas, Igor Ballyhoo, Cica Ghost, Rebeca Bashly, Jarla Capalini, Gitu Aura, NicoleX Moonwall, and Ini Inaka. Bravo to the talented Blue Orange curator Ini Inaka for an art space so beautifully and creatively put together.

Igor invited me to stop by yesterday to check out Duality. A glass stair way leads up to a large build of hollowed-out cement cubes connected by metal pipes.  Contained in this construct is a pair of avatar-sized figures. Surrounding all this is a flow of moving neon text. Igor is a stellar builder, self-taught as many of us in the virtual world, who at this point has reached level of mastery that is hard to surpass. He uses his building skills to express symbolically thoughts about things, often controversial in nature, but not always. The build Duality expresses our conflicting experiences with the virtual and the real. Here is an excerpt from our conversation:

[2017/04/26 12:18] Igor Ballyhoo: it is contemplation of our two existances
[2017/04/26 12:18] Igor Ballyhoo: RL and SL
[2017/04/26 12:19] Igor Ballyhoo: we are one being in our minds
[2017/04/26 12:19] Igor Ballyhoo: yet our common sense make us keep this two worlds separated
[2017/04/26 12:19] Kate Bergdorf (KateBergdorf Resident): yeah
[2017/04/26 12:19] Kate Bergdorf (KateBergdorf Resident): so it is about the virtual and the real
[2017/04/26 12:19] Kate Bergdorf (KateBergdorf Resident): and the two and the one
[2017/04/26 12:20] Igor Ballyhoo: so we are struggling to get out and keep reality
[2017/04/26 12:20] Igor Ballyhoo: yes, it is duality
[2017/04/26 12:20] Kate Bergdorf (KateBergdorf Resident): it is and it isn’t though
[2017/04/26 12:20] Kate Bergdorf (KateBergdorf Resident): that is why we are so preoccupied with it, no?
[2017/04/26 12:20] Igor Ballyhoo: what do you mean
[2017/04/26 12:21] Kate Bergdorf (KateBergdorf Resident): i often find myself thinking both
[2017/04/26 12:21] Igor Ballyhoo: we are struggling to keep two realities separated
[2017/04/26 12:21] Kate Bergdorf (KateBergdorf Resident): that the virtual and real world lives are separate
[2017/04/26 12:21] Kate Bergdorf (KateBergdorf Resident): but also the same
[2017/04/26 12:21] Kate Bergdorf (KateBergdorf Resident): i think we might be talking about the same thing lol
[2017/04/26 12:22] Igor Ballyhoo: yes, work is pretty obvious I think

Head over and check out Igor’s and the other artist’s work at Blue Orange (make sure to set to Midnight and Ultra when viewing Duality). All these exhibits are a feast for the eye.

I revisited Empty Minds today. I had been already when it first opened, but didn’t have time to blog about it then. This is another gorgeous work by Romy; I recognize the set-up, the little scenes with stories, from her previous works. Throughout the hilly, sim-sized layout we find here figures in groups, sometimes by themselves, with large empty bubble heads. They are involved in all kinds of activities, some carry with them lanterns, perhaps to shed light on which path to take next. Romy notes about her work that [i]t is made known that if an idea is born in your empty mind, you must come to disregard it. Nobody knows why. The origin of that idea was lost. Maybe you’ll be the first to have the idea to not to discard your ideas.  This is once again a sublime installation by this talented artist. Head over and take a look and make sure to grab one of the free avatars before you leave.

Photographs by Kate Bergdorf

melancholy

There is a new exhibit at MetaLES, melancholy, by Ini in Inaka, curated by Ux Hax and Romy Nayar. This photography exhibit consists of a large construct that houses about 20 photographs by the talented Ini. The set-up of the show feels very modern, even for the virtual world; there is a merging of the images, the geometrical build and the sim that defies the standard boundaries of simply handing pictures on wall in a Second Life gallery. The graphic-inspired photographs by Ini and the geometrical shape of the build blend beautifully. As usual, we were chatting as we were flying and walking around, here is an excerpt:

[2017/03/26 05:46] Kate Bergdorf (KateBergdorf Resident): i like the texture of these panels
[2017/03/26 05:46] tutsy Navarathna: each time Romy does a new delirium of installation :))
[2017/03/26 05:48] tutsy Navarathna: she could do great theater installations
[2017/03/26 05:48] Kate Bergdorf (KateBergdorf Resident): yeah
[2017/03/26 05:48] tutsy Navarathna: I find it very theatrical
[2017/03/26 05:49] Kate Bergdorf (KateBergdorf Resident): yes great drama, love it
[2017/03/26 05:51] tutsy Navarathna: Ini is one in SL who try to use pic more like graphism
[2017/03/26 05:52] Kate Bergdorf (KateBergdorf Resident): yeah and it works really well with this geometrical black and white set-up by Romy
[2017/03/26 05:52] Kate Bergdorf (KateBergdorf Resident): great combo
[2017/03/26 05:52] tutsy Navarathna: yes 🙂
[2017/03/26 05:52] Kate Bergdorf (KateBergdorf Resident): are we sure Romy made the set-up?
[2017/03/26 05:52] tutsy Navarathna: i think
[2017/03/26 05:52] Kate Bergdorf (KateBergdorf Resident): ok lol

A fantastic new show this for sure, and above all, like many of the exhibits lately at MetaLES, it feels groundbreaking in the sense that it defies the norms of traditional photograph exhibit display. Head over and take a look.

Photographs by Tutsy Navarathna and Kate Bergdorf

art in february

the-haul

In addition to the two shows currently at Berg by Nordan Art, Penumbra, by Meilo Minotaur and CapCat Ragu, and lacrimioare by Huck Hax, there is some incredible art to be seen in Second Life right now. First, we have to most recent installation, The Haul, by Haveit Neox, curated by Ux Hax and Romy Nayar, at MetaLES. We visited The Haul without any prior knowledge or information about it. And rather than attempting to interpret it here, I will share with you part of our conversation from when we visited the installation earlier today.

the-haul

[05:41] tutsy Navarathna: for me haveit is always in same time messy and poetic
[05:41] k a t e (KateBergdorf Resident): yeah, well put
[05:41] tutsy Navarathna: i like what he does
[05:41] k a t e (KateBergdorf Resident): a poetic mess
[05:41] k a t e (KateBergdorf Resident): me too
[05:42] k a t e (KateBergdorf Resident): he has his style, we know it is by him
[05:42] tutsy Navarathna: i don’t mind not to understand something
[05:42] k a t e (KateBergdorf Resident): i agree, its just a feeling
[05:42] tutsy Navarathna: we can let our imagination going on
[05:43] k a t e (KateBergdorf Resident): aww look at those figures above us
[05:43] k a t e (KateBergdorf Resident): soo beautiful
[05:43] k a t e (KateBergdorf Resident): i want to take a pic, just a sec
[05:43] k a t e (KateBergdorf Resident): the colors, the gentleness
[05:43] tutsy Navarathna: yes all details are very well done just as by a painter
[05:43] k a t e (KateBergdorf Resident): yeah does feel like a painting
[05:44] tutsy Navarathna: organic, vegetal
[05:44] tutsy Navarathna: mythologic
[05:44] k a t e (KateBergdorf Resident): he puts his soul into this
[05:45] k a t e (KateBergdorf Resident): this is really tremendously beautiful
[05:46] k a t e (KateBergdorf Resident): the longer i look at it, the more i see
[05:46] k a t e (KateBergdorf Resident): the figures that are part of this emerge
[05:46] tutsy Navarathna: yes need time to see all details and personnages

Head over and take a look at this latest work by Haveit and make sure to check out the installation Illogism by ChimKami Resident as well. Thank you Ux and Romy for all the incredible works you show at MetaLES!

untitled

We have a Pink Floyd themed event at Orange Blue that opened this past weekend and will unfortunately close later today already. Curated by Ini Inaka, we find here sculptures by Igor Ballyhoo, animated textures by Willem Koba and walls by Ini Inaka and LeeAllison. I was lucky to bump into Ini as I was standing around putting together this post and she gave me some hints on how to experience this work; use Advanced Lighting and Midnight WL and wear the Record Thrower object provided and use mouse-look to crash walls. Following these instructions is indeed vital for an optimal experience; suddenly light is moving and flickering and walls come crashing down! Noteworthy here are of course also the older works by Igor Ballyhoo, My Lovely Wife, From Green Into Red and Red Into Green and Frozen Brain, amongst others. These sculptures so clearly have stood the test of time; I have said it before, and I will say it again, Igor’s works are Second Life classics. When I asked Ini to tell me a bit about this Pink Floyd themed event, she responded that the idea here was to let people destroy walls. And she noted, “Pink Floyd said it all:” Another Brick in the Wall. Thanks for showing me all this Ini and thanks also for refreshing my rusty mouse-look skills!

naninona

Another remarkable show currently on display is NaniNona, by Romy Nayar. I haven’t seen work by Romy in a while and was pleasantly surprised to see this little exquisite installation. About her work, Romy states in her note card, Nani nona na ni no na nani nona na ni nona naninona na ni nona na ninona na nino na na nino. Na ni nona naninona, na ni no naninona, na, ni nona ( nanino na nani no) na ninon a, which made me smile for the entire period that I wandered throughout this enchanting show. The exhibit consists of several rooms connected by doors. In each room, there is a display of a simple scene, all scenes seem to me to be little whimsical parts of stories, all remarkable in their own way and how they are displayed. All comes together here, Romy’s colors and her genial use of magical little figures and objects. Bravo, bravo, bravo Romy!

untitled

Finally, we have another installation, Frogs, by Cica Ghost, that opened a few days ago. I am happy to see that Cica is back on a roll again and showing installations on a more frequent basis. Frogs consists of a hilly landscape, a few trees and the ruin of what once must have been a house. Situated on the ruin, there is a girl who is drawing on a wall; the drawing is of a girl dreaming of prince. On the other side of the wall there is another girl at a table watching TV and eating a lollipop. The TV is broken and the scene depicted inside it is very similar to the one in which the girl at the table finds herself outside of it. These two girls, with their dreams and fears, are at the center of the installation. Surrounding them, are a number of large frogs, moving gently in place. This installation feels a bit more hopeful than Cica’s last one somehow, more playful. And I always love seeing her  little figures, dressed like dolls, in knitted sweaters and socks. Great detail here, head over and take a look. There is a free frog avatar available at the landing point, make sure to click the sign.

Top photograph by Tutsy Navarathna and all others by Kate Bergdorf

illogism

There is a new exhibit, Illogism, by ChimKami, curated by Ux Hax and Romy Nayar, at MetaLES, that opened to the public yesterday. I could unfortunately not attend due to RL commitments, but was lucky enough to have received a sneak-peek preview a few days before. Let me tell you, if there was ever an upside-down world that made sense to me, it would be this one! First-time exhibitor Chim is off to an excellent start with this work, combining her 55 photographs as well as objects, poses and movement to produce an exhilarating whole. Visitors are encouraged to fly or use the Walker HUD for optimal experience; with it you can walk up walls and generally get a sense of being upside down and have a tilted and overall quite mesmerizing experience. I also adore the colors used in this installation; integrated with the rest, it simply leaves one smiling and feeling happy. See above for the machinima of this exhibit, put together by Tutsy Navarathna; it captures the installation so beautifully. Bravo to all for your contributions to this exhibit. It will be open until the end of February, head over before it is too late.

Tout est Allumé by Tutsy Navarathna

tout-est-allume-01

For those of you who have not yet seen the exhibit Tout est Allumé, by French artist Tutsy Navarathna at MetaLES, there is still time. This spectacular work, curated by Ux Hax and Romy Nayar, with technical assistance by ChimKami and Yoon, will be open until the end of the year. What we find here are six stories of machinima art, 35 movies all in all, made up of 16 machinima and 19 short animations. It would be a mistake to think of this as simply a retrospective of Tutsy’s machinima as there are several new shorter animations to be seen as well. All films are displayed on several levels and to me they somehow feel both separate and connected. The space surrounding the machinima consists of geometric shapes, some of are moving and some static. Translucent staircases connect the different floors. Crucial to the experience of this multidimensional work are of course the animations and music, which are set in continuous loops. There are poses and props, rain, umbrellas, a grand piano and much more, all contributing to a most unique and playful immersive experience.

tout-est-allume-02

This is a monumental installation and well thought out in its complexity. The visitor will want to come prepared to spend time. Tutsy has with this work integrated sound, movement and animation to create a sophisticated immersive whole and with it beautifully displays the notion of the virtual; virtual reality, augmented reality, virtual life, immersive worlds … these new words describe a part of our future. My movies in Second Life try to show how virtuality is part of our reality. The influence it has on our thoughts, our artistic creations, our friendly or romantic relationships. A phenomenon still very young, virtual life has a bright future and like all major revolutions it is worth to see more closely, trying to understand, even flying too close to the sun and burn your wings . . . Bravo Tutsy, this is truly a groundbreaking contribution not only to our SL world of art but also to the virtual community at large. Noteworthy is also that visitors to this exhibit will likely not have any technical difficulties at all. The machinima themselves are easy to play; simply place the cursor on the bar on the movie screen and press play, replay or stop. They can also be viewed on the web. It quite remarkable to me how these films can be played simultaneously inworld without the sound or the visuals of each machinima interfering with the other. Quite the technical challenge, congrats to all involved for mastering this aspect too. The recommended WL is midnight and draw-distance 200. There are illuminated lines and large arrows on the ground showing the way. Head over and take a look before this installation closes to the public in about two weeks. You will not want to miss it!

Photographs by Tutsy Navarathna

art in december

hand

There is a lot going on in the SL art world in December! Here is a selection only as I unfortunately don’t have time to cover all installations and exhibits. I wish I did. First, the new work by Canadian artist Bryn Oh, Hand, opened a few days ago. This is a complex installation, complete with  instructions on WL, and other settings provided at the landing point. It is well worth the effort to follow these basic guidelines, as they significantly shape the overall impression. There is also a HUD provided, which will further enhance the visitors’ experience. As always with Bryn’s works, there is a narrative, this time it is a story about a girl named Flutter. We follow Flutter along with the HUD chapters as she explores the whimsical world on this sim. It is as usual a great pleasure taking in the work by Bryn; the narrative, the carefully crafted original objects, the layout, sounds, and the WL are all magnificent. Make sure not to miss this.

31384699952_a87932c784_z

Also recently opened to the public is the newest installation by JadeYu Fhang, OpeRaAnxiEty, at MetaLES, curated by Ux Hax and Romy Nayar. This exhibit replaces the installation Tumor, by Igor Ballyhoo, while the work Tout est Allumé, by Tutsy Navarathna, remains on the display until the end of the year. This is a large immersive sci-fi inspired work, beautifully laid out with various webs, mist and android shapes. As a large spider nursing half-human eggs in its web, we witness a sense of busy anxiety here, reminiscent perhaps of the weaving of our own confounding webs.  Many photographers have already found their way to this build and we have seen some fantastic images on Flickr. Head over and take a look.

30588919054_15eafd1255_z

In my humble opinion one of the most talented SL photographers, Isa Messioptra (also owner of the sim Crestwick, which includes The Pretentious Gallery) has a new show, Cerebral Frame, curated by dixmix source, at the DixMix Gallery. This is a compilation of thirteen older works by Isa, both in color and black and white. There is a captivating narrative in all of this artist’s images that draw the viewer in, leaving us wanting to know more. Bravo Isa, it so great to see your work on display.

30740026814_f259d5861d_o

Last, but not least, we have a new show coming up on December 17 at 12 PM SLT at the Blue and Orange Art Project (venue will open on the day of exhibit opening), curated by Ini Inaka and Gitu Aura. There is an incredibly talented group of artists showing their work here; Theda Tammas, Indigoclaire, Miu Miu Miu, Eupalinos Ugajin, and Igor Ballyhoo. My curiosity is peaked for sure! I have unfortunately not had a chance to visit this gallery before, but will most definitely try to check this out.

Photograph by Kate Bergdorf

art in november

from-here-on-there-be-dragons

There is plenty of art to be seen in SL in November. Currently at my own gallery, Berg by Nordan Art, we have The Joy Formidable, by Livio Korobase, and L’avion en Papier, by ◦⊱Mi⊰◦, both open until the end of the year. My first stop on my gallery tour this morning then was the recently opened From here on there be dragons, by Alpha Auer, curated by Dividini Shostakovich, at Split Screen Installation Space. The installation will be open until the end of January 2017. First off, let me just say, nobody does gold in SL like Alpha Auer (previously covered here). This installation consists of several large golden dragons, mirrored in the renaissance map surface below, and surrounded by modern geometric black structures. Alpha notes that [w]hen Medieval and Renaissance map makers got to the edge of the world, they used to write “beyond this place there be dragons,” meaning dangerous or unexplored territories that sailors should beware of before attempting to cross into them. This was expressed by the visual practice of putting dragons, sea serpents and other mythological creatures in uncharted areas of maps. In this installation I have used a Renaissance map, a leaf from Abraham Ortelius’s “Theatrum Orbis Terrarum,” as the floor of a dark, geometric architecture which floats high in the sky, depicting an abstract, reflected world guarded by tangibly real-looking dragons. Alpha Auer, aka Elif Ayiter, is a designer, educator and researcher, you can read more about what she does on her website.

25303571899_2717cd9cb6_o

My second gallery stop was the exhibit Always Closer, by the French artist Lil’ Frenchie elo, curated by Dido Haas at Nitroglobus Roof Gallery. The exhibit will be open until the end of December 2016. Here we find sixteen large photographs, mostly studies of BDSM, beautifully put together and quite expressive. Elo notes that [s]ubmission is the ability to give the best of you to the one you love, without any questioning about the reasons of this love. It’s there, that’s all and you must show it, you must say it, and get Always Closer to it, because life is too short. Great job putting this together Elo, congratulations.

untitled

At MetaLES, curated by Ux Hax and Romy Nayar, is still open on the ground the installation Tumor by Igor Ballyhoo. In the MetaLES sky space can be found the exhibit, Tout Est Allume, by  Tutsy Navarathna. This is a compilation of 16 machinima and 19 animated shorts by Tutsy. About this exhibit, he notes that [a] friend of mine, Etienne Armand Amato, once mentioned this: It’s because we only have one life we need . . . several. Virtual reality, augmented reality, virtual life, immersive worlds … These new words describe a part of our future. My movies in Second Life try to show how virtuality is part of our reality. The influence it has on our thoughts, our artistic creations, our friendly or romantic relationships. A phenomenon still very young, virtual life has a bright future and like all major revolutions it is worth to see more closely, trying to understand, even flying too close to the sun and burn your wings . . . The show will be open until the end of the year.

31184105305_0b699b471b_o

Lastly, we have an exhibit an multi-artist exhibit by Maloe Vansant, Fingers Scintilla and Dixmix Source at the DIXMIX Gallery, which opens tomorrow, Wednesday, November 23 at 12 PM SLT. Head over to the opening if you can, it promises to be a great exhibit by these three talented photographers.

Photograph on top by Kate Bergdorf