phabolaois strain

There is a new destination, Phabolaois strain, by the designer duo Miuccia Klaar and Squonk Levenque. This is a mostly flat space, but with a few hills, consisting of water and rain. Trees, boats, docks, benches, houses, seagulls, ruins, a light house and a large air balloon, as well as other objects, are dispersed throughout. The sim derives it’s theme from the island Phabolaois strain, founded in 1578: The discovery of large amounts of hephaestium due to the great meteor shower of 1862 made the island interesting to neighboring countries such as France that was not blessed in receiving this new and revolutionary mineral. After the failure of diplomacy France sent its troops in march 1865. A task force invaded Phabolaois stran finding only little resistance by the natives. The 1st batallion legionaires and the 4th senegalese tirailleurs occupied and ruled the land for a short period of time. Britain did not respond as most of the troops were involved in the African campain (1865-1877) which ended with the battle of Tripoli and with the Border and Sea Protection Act issued 1864 to respond to the threat of Germany and Austro-Hungarian naval forces. Indiscipline and boredom drove the french occupying troops out of Phabolaois stran to join the Belgian army as mercenaries. The island remained inhabited until 1928 when Gwynplaine, son of Lord Clancharlie, one of King James political enemies, arrived and established himself in a little surviving property, seeking refuge from the king’s men and Dr. Hardquannone and his ”comprachicos” (pirates scavenging the coast). Due to his disfigurement, Gwynplaine sought isolation and peace together with his blind girlfriend Dea, his friend Ursus and his beloved dog Homo. Only the mansion, a few wrecks from the french invasion and the remains of an unknown ancient city are still to be seen. Seagulls and a deadly and deceiving tide protects Phabolaois strain today.

Phabolaois strain has a set region WL, which I strongly suggest to use as it makes all the difference in the world. It lends the sim the foggy, misty and generally wet ambience I believe it was meant to have. While the theme of the sim at first glance is of course about the old island, to me the meaning of it also extends beyond that; the places created by Miuccia and Squonk are generally all about the inside and the outside. The outside, with  rain, grim, bare, cold, leaves the visitor feeling lost or, perhaps forlorn. The inside, which usually consists of interiors of decaying builds, piles of thrown together old stuff, but a perfect mess really, suggests belonging, warmth and comfort. The visitor’s experience of the interior and exterior spaces combined is a sense of poetic melancholy.

Let me also note here that there is no doubt in mind that this designer pair has found the perfect virtual rain. It is heavy and strong, pouring and wet, with just the right amount of feeling of wind. I am also in awe about the objects that are repeatedly used by them, mostly refurbished, scruffy old stuff. These are things that have been found in a virtual attic or flee-market, no doubt. Head over and take a look and make sure to post your pics in the Phabolaois strain Flickr group.

Addendum: Here are a few things I neglected to include: As of today, the sim is not yet open to the public, but it will be soon. Also, there will be moments, and I suspect this is dependent upon the tide, when it will not rain! Finally, and so glad to hear this, the cool space Le Petit Japon will still be accessible.

Photographs by Kate Bergdorf

art in march

dathuil

There is some great art to be seen in Second Life this month. I’ve been unusually busy in RL lately and have missed attending SL openings and also haven’t been able to blog about them in advance. But this morning then we started on a filled-to-the-brim-kinda-art-day and I am happy to share with you here what we experienced. Our first stop was Dathuil Gallery of Art, where Prairie Kawashima yesterday had the opening for her show Private Sphere, curated by Lucy Diamond and Max Butoh. It has been a bit quiet lately at dathuil and I was happy to see that exhibits are up and running again! I love the way this show is set up; there are simply a group of strategically placed screens in the middle of the room on the ground floor, some with photographs and some without. The viewer has the experience of being in maze and faces the photographs wandering thought it. The photographs themselves are subtly provocative with an erotic edge and technically really well done. Prairie notes about her exhibit that [f]or almost a decade, Second Life has been my refuge – a place of boredom, excess, love and inspiration. Some of this incredible mixture that i keep enjoying so much has turned into a river of self-shots (including occasional homages to my closest friends) that has found its way to my flickr account. Other things will forever remain private. “Private Sphere” is a selection of mostly unpublished pictures that have been between these two categories for some time. Some of them I’m still not sure if they shouldn’t have remained private. In any event, I hope you can enjoy parts of it.  This exhibit will be open until April 2. Head over and take a look if you haven’t already.

lea10

We had heard here and there, via a few group announcements and random private notecard invitations by artists, that something was brewing at LEA10. To my knowledge, there has been no major formal announcement by Linden Endowment for the Arts themselves, other than a posting on their blog, about the exhibits that opened yesterday. It seems it was left to the artists themselves to promote the event. Luckily, resident-artist blip mumfuzz (above, left) teleported us in to her part of this sim-wide Victorian London themed group show. blip’s exhibit is dispersed amongst two floors and consists of photographs taken on her virtual world journeys. She notes that I am an improviser by nature…in life and in my art. My images are typically the result of an unplanned, spontaneous interaction with my environment. I got into image-making as a way to record my travels through SL and as a way to hold onto the memory of some of those places. Soon, however, I noticed that I started seeing differently…looking in a different way. I found that once I found saw something interesting I’d start moving the camera around. Looking over and under, behind and between. I began looking less at the things themselves…and more at visual and spatial relationships things. Do head over and check out blip’s work, the LEA10 link above will take you there; and continue wandering around outside to explore the work of other artists. There are several great photographers (I believe around 40) who have their work on display here, nestled in spaces amongst little Victorian stores; most noteworthy to us was the stellar work by Kato Salyut.

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Our third stop was a little sneak-peek preview of the exhibit Wandering World, by nekonuko Nakamori, presented by One Caress. The opening is today, March 5, 2015 at 10 AM SLT and the show will remain open until the end of the month. This is the second exhibit in a very short period of time by the talented Miss Nakamori; her other show, [I AM nekonuko] Who are you?, opened at IMAGO last month. The One Caress show, a collection of 24 photographs, is displayed in a large maze of sorts. The maze, as well as the texture used, serve as a great backdrop for these large colorful images. As we were finding our way through the winding path we lingered a while in front of photographs.

2017/03/05 08:10] k a t e (KateBergdorf Resident): i like this one
[2017/03/05 08:11] tutsy Navarathna: she has a poetic univers
[2017/03/05 08:11] k a t e (KateBergdorf Resident): she does, her own world

Head over and take a look for yourselves at this lovely exhibit. All photographs are for sale in the last little room.

untitledOther noteworthy exhibits that you don’t want to miss this month are, in no particular order, Under the Sea by Cica Ghost (see image above); Bleeding Books by Haveit Neox at Split ScreenAlpha Auer at UTSA ArtSpace; and The Art Rocket by Betty Tureaud at LEA19.

Photographs by Tutsy Navarathna and Kate Bergdorf

Japan at One Caress

japan-at-one-caress

Today I re-visited Japan, a newish addition to One Caress, by sim designer duo Squonk Levenque and Miuccia Klaar; it is located in the sky and accessible from the One Caress landing space. I’ve been wanting to visit again for a while and my report is long overdue. Upon landing in the sky area, one stands in a small dark space. There is no direction or advice on how to proceed from there, which I think is very clever; the visitor has to sort it out and find a way on their own. Suddenly, after a few attempts to enter, one is then on a street surrounded by busyness and neon lights. That is all that Japan really is – a little street. But this is not any short strip of street, far from it. Rarely have I seen in SL a place with so much ambience in such a small space. The details here are incredible and there is stuff in most every corner. But nothing is really random here I think, each object seems to have been placed with the utmost consideration for space and overall impact. And it rains. The rain somehow envelopes the space and makes it come together as a whole. I am so impressed. Bravo Miu and Squonk, this place is nothing short of astonishing. Oh, and as I was standing around blogging, my friend Huckleberry Hax  eventually joined me and took some amazing photos; be on the lookout for them on his Flickr stream.

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Photographs by Kate Bergdorf

H220

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Those who know me know that I like rain and especially in Second Life©. One of the best “rain sims,”H22O,  beautifully put together by Miuccia Klaar and Squonk Levenque, is sadly closing by the end of next week. Head over and take a look before it is all gone, I really think this is a must see. What you will find is a large  area enveloped in heavy rain and thunder; some trees and bushes, decaying builds and a few other selected item are strategically placed throughout. Crows are flying around or just standing. There is a sense of poetry here, a lovely place. Go and take a look.

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Photographs by Kate Bergdorf