Tag: Del May Poses

Avatar Posing

Avatar posing

At some point people who are taking virtual pictures of avatars realize they must start using brand poses in order to improve the quality of their images. The various standing, sitting, and walking poses in the AO will no longer do, neither will the built in furniture poses. Of course these are still used from time to time, but the main pose source becomes the separately purchased brand poses. This shift in a virtual photographer’s thinking about poses seems to happen about the same time that there is a change, and also more sophisticated approach, in integrating into the virtual image windlight, shadows/light/DOF, and editing. All of these factors contribute individually to an enhanced expression of feeling and mood in a virtual photograph.

For the longest time the go-to pose-maker was Del May (Del May Poses). The last few years, however, we have seen an influx of other talented pose-makers, here roughly in chronological order, like Olivia Lalonde (Le Poppycock), Fanny Finney (Ana Poses), Keon Xenga (RK Poses),  Lily Lovelace (KOPFKINO), E.Nantes (E.Poses), Toxx Genest (IntoXx), and Marina Münter (Blaue Reiter Poses). There is an array of pose companies out there, I am simply mentioning here a handful of makers that I tend to use a lot personally. Each of the pose-makers add their own styles and characteristics to their specific poses, making them in that sense unique.

Since all of our avatars are built differently, tweaking of pose-maker poses often needs to be done with AnyPose, a pose adjusting system that lets the user move each avatar body joint separately. Most recently, LeLutka put on the market an avatar face system, the LeLutka Axis HUD Face, that allows us to change avatar facial expressions as well. These separate tweaking systems are quite expensive and take a while to learn, but if you are looking to improve your avatar photography, both are worth purchasing and learning how to use.

Avatar brand poses are available at the pose brand stores and monthly shopping events (and later on usually as Gacha in each specific pose store as well). Most are also on the Second Life Market Place. The brand-pose business has flourished over the past years and I think it is safe to say that brand poses are now just as desirable and lucrative as hair, skin and clothing.

Photograph by Kate Bergdorf

Le serpent qui dance

For the past few weeks I’ve been completely caught up in finishing a collection of photographs for an upcoming exhibit at Itakos. The exhibit, The Dancing Serpent, inspired by the poem with the same name by Charles Baudelaire (Fleurs du Mal, 1857), is curated by Akim Alonzo. The opening is this Sunday, May 14, at 1:30PM SLT.

Baudelaire’s poem Le serpent qui dance is playful, filled with erotic symbolism and metaphor; it is an ode to desire and longing, no doubt, sexual and otherwise. It consist of nine parts. As the themes for my ten photographs I picked one sentence from each part, as well as the name of the poem itself. There are at least twenty translations of Le serpent qui dance; I ended up choosing the version by William Aggeler, translated in 1954.

Putting together this exhibit led me down a path of self-examination. I came up against content issues where I questioned my use of the female subject as a nude. I realized finally that adding a male subject in some of the images would add a much-needed tension. Also, during the weeks that I worked on this virtual world project I simultaneously had several deadlines in real life that needed to be met. I had to seriously consider the importance of time and how it was spent. I reached the conclusion that the process of creativity, regardless if in real life or virtual life, could only aid me in the sense that it provided a welcomed escape from too much thinking. Lastly, I questioned the meaning of the virtual world Flickr photography itself.

About virtual world Flickr photography then. I showed my ten completed photographs to several friends, all of whom I respect in part because they are talented virtual world photographers who I know will not hesitate to offer constructive criticism. I was pleased with their feedback and, yes, relieved, because like so many others, I never really know if my work is any good. I then showed the images to a friend who is a real life photographer, but does not himself have a Second Life Flickr account. He simply refused to comment. Once I got over his frustrating lack of response, I started pondering what some of his reasons for not commenting may have been. He did not want to offend me with negative feedback, could it be that simple? His only observation, which was something like “everybody on Flickr will love it,” referred to the fact that nude virtual world images receive a disproportionate amount of attention on Flickr? Or could it be that he had actually failed to comprehend that a photograph is a photograph, regardless if taken in real or virtual life? I don’t think I will ever know, but I believe this perhaps nicely illustrates a common reluctance of “real life” photographers to embrace and accept the newness and, yes, modernity, of virtual world Flickr photography. If I sound defensive, it is because I am. But it is not about my work, it is about feeling protective of virtual world Flickr itself. Because rarely in my life have I seen as much creative talent in one place as I have seen there.

This post ended up being much longer than I thought, lots of rambling here. Thank for reading all the way through if you did. Also, and finally, thanks to Akim, an excellent curator, for asking me to show at your beautiful gallery. Thank you also very much to Tutsy Navarathna and Huck Hax for posing; I honestly can’t think of two more patient posers. Thanks to pose makers Del May (Del May Poses) and Olivia LaLonde (Le Poppycock) for your incredible poses, without them, these images could never have been produced.

Poster created by Akim Alonzo